PEI

Skip the Waiting Room program at Charlottetown clinic a success

The Skip the Waiting Room pilot program at the Downtown Walk-in Clinic in Charlottetown is proving popular, with patients going online to book an appointment, which means they don't to register at the clinic in person.

Pilot project allows patients to register online for an appointment at the clinic, avoid waiting room

The Skip the Waiting Room program, begun in November, has become popular with Charlottetown residents. (CBC)

The Skip the Waiting Room pilot program at the Downtown Walk-in Clinic in Charlottetown is proving popular, with patients going online to book an appointment — which means they don't have to register at the clinic in person.

Even better, the patient receives a call when it's time to leave for the appointment.

It has been working well for the clients and it has been working well for the staff at the clinic.— Mark Richardson, Skip the Waiting Room

The program has been going very well since it began on Nov. 20 said Mark Richardson, chief executive officer and founder of Skip the Waiting Room.

"We just last week have had over 500 people register online and actually be able to completely go through and see the doctor," said Richardson. "So we are pretty excited about that. That was a pretty big milestone for us."

Slots for online registrations have been fully used every time they're available — in other words, the service is popular. 

"It has been working well for the clients and it has been working well for the staff at the clinic," Richardson said. 

Shortly after they have been seen by a doctor, patients are sent a text message inviting them to provide feedback. About 95 per cent of the people who have used the system have said they like it.

Most patients are seen 15 to 18 minutes after they arrive at the clinic, although there have been times when it's slightly longer.

The pilot project runs until the end of August though Richardson says he would like to see Skip the Waiting Room continue beyond that date and eventually be used other walk-in clinics.

Richardson received an Innovation PEI grant in January 2015 of $25,000 to develop the project. 

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