PEI

Shelagh Rogers awarded Symons Medal

Veteran CBC broadcaster Shelagh Rogers has been awarded the annual Symons Medal, which recognizes an individual who has made an exceptional contribution to Canadian life.

The CBC broadcast journalist is also known for her advocacy work

Shelagh Rogers' career at the CBC goes back decades. (Submitted by Confederation Centre of the Arts)

Veteran CBC broadcaster Shelagh Rogers has been awarded the annual Symons Medal, which recognizes an individual who has made an exceptional contribution to Canadian life.

The Symons Medal is named after Prof. Thomas H.B. Symons, the founding president of Trent University and a long-time board member and supporter of  Confederation Centre of the Arts. First awarded in 2004, recipients have included David Suzuki, Prince Charles, Murray Sinclair, and Mary Simon.

A hallmark of the award is a lecture presented at Confederation Centre in Charlottetown. Rogers will present her lecture Oct. 13.

In addition to her long career at CBC, Rogers has been recognized for her advocacy work for adult literacy, her promotion of truth and reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, and for fighting against the stigma of mental illness by sharing the story of her own depression.

"She is one of the nation's most beloved storytellers, and her advocacy work has had a monumental impact on our country," said Robert Sear, co-chair of the Symons Medal committee, in a news release.

The medal presentation and lecture are meant to offer a national platform for an eminent Canadian to discuss the nation's current state, shared histories, and prospects.

Tickets for the lecture are free, but interested people are asked to book in advance. The lecture will also be live streamed.

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