PEI

If caught in a rip current, stay calm and swim parallel to shore: Red Cross

Emily MacDonald, with the Red Cross, shared a few tips on how to deal with rip currents and dangerous surf conditions on P.E.I. beaches.

And listen to the lifeguards, says Emily MacDonald with Red Cross

If you do get caught in one, Emily MacDonald says remain calm because 'you don't want to waste your energy panicking.' (Steve Bruce/CBC)

An advocate for water safety wants Islanders to be aware of what they should do if they get caught in a rip current.

Emily MacDonald with the Red Cross, says rip currents are common in P.E.I. because of how quickly the tides change and she even shared a few tips on how to deal with rip currents and dangerous surf conditions on Island beaches.

But first, what is a rip current?

"It is a channelized body of water that's pushing water away from the shore," she said, and it's "very easy" to get caught in them.

And if you do get caught in one, MacDonald said remain calm because "you don't want to waste your energy panicking."

Emily MacDonald with the Red Cross says rip currents are common in P.E.I. because of how quickly the tides change. (CBC)

To escape a rip current, swim parallel to the shore.

MacDonald said she always tells people to not swim by themselves, and, if you haven't taken swimming lessons yourself, to swim with someone who is an experienced swimmer.

When at the beach, she also said people should pay close attention to the surf conditions and listen to the lifeguards on site.

"They're at the beach every day, they know the conditions," she said.

"So when you're walking into the beach and you see those signs that might say danger or caution, you always want to take those seriously."

More P.E.I. news

With files from CBC News: Compass

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