PEI

Appeal hearing set over apartment complex denied by Charlottetown

Developer Tim Banks is appealing the City of Charlottetown's decision to deny his proposal to build an apartment building downtown on Richmond Street.

City, developer to make their cases to IRAC on Oct. 10

Developer Tim Banks wants to put a 23-unit, four-storey apartment building next to Rochford Condominiums on Richmond Street in downtown Charlottetown. (Krystalle Ramlakhan/CBC)

Developer Tim Banks is appealing the City of Charlottetown's decision to deny his proposal to build an apartment building downtown on Richmond Street.

Banks, president of the APM Group, wants to put up a 23-unit, four-storey apartment building at 55 and 59 Richmond Street. He said there is an option to close on the properties if he gets the development permit.

Earlier this year, Banks brought the idea to the city, but this summer the city decided not to allow the project to proceed to the public consultation phase. Now, Banks has filed an appeal with the Island Regulatory and Appeals Commission.

Micro-units

Banks said the new building would be micro-units at affordable housing prices.

"I believe that we're going to be 30 per cent below the market rents in the downtown core for new occupancy," he said.

"We've done a similar project in the Halifax marketplace using micro-units and the uptake on them was really, really good and we think the uptake will be very good here for young professionals … or it could be just for seniors."

Banks says he's confident his proposal is within the existing rules for downtown apartment buildings. (Krystalle Ramlakhan/CBC)

The city on Tuesday said because the matter is currently before IRAC, it won't comment.

But during a meeting in August, councillors voted six to four against allowing the project to move forward. The mayor raised concerns about the proposed building's proximity to the building next door, the Rochford Condominiums.

First-floor variance

However, Banks said his proposal is within existing rules and he doesn't want the building any taller than the rules will allow. He said the variance being requested relates to the height of the first floor of the building. The proposal also wanted a minor variance to reduce the minimum frontage from 82 feet. to 74.5 feet. 

IRAC will hear the appeal Tuesday, Oct. 10. Both parties will make their case and a panel will make a decision.The hearing is open to the public and audio will be broadcast on IRAC's website.

About the Author

Krystalle Ramlakhan is a multi-platform journalist with CBC Ottawa. She has also worked for CBC in P.E.I., Winnipeg and Iqaluit.