PEI

Purity Dairy launches milk alternative made of oats and barley

After more than 75 years in the dairy industry, P.E.I.'s Purity Dairy is reaching into new markets with its first plant-based product.

Non-dairy milk product was developed locally and is sourced locally

The beverages come in three flavours: original, vanilla and chocolate. (Mitch Cormier/CBC)

After more than 75 years in the dairy industry, P.E.I.'s Purity Dairy is reaching into new markets with its first plant-based product.

The company has begun making a new plant-based beverage, made from oats and barley. The drink come in three flavours: original, chocolate and vanilla.

Purity general manager Tom Cullen said the company recognized the opportunity some time ago, and has been developing the product for a couple of years in partnership with Canada's Smartest Kitchen at Holland College's Culinary Institute of Canada.

"A lot of work to try to get the right flavour and taste and mouth feel," said Cullen.

"We really felt that was part of the opportunity. We weren't that impressed with the flavour and taste of some of the leading brands out there, and said well there's an opportunity here. We can do better."

Barley is better

Almonds lead the non-dairy milk category, said Cullen, but oat is the fastest-growing alternative, and that contributed to their decision to move in that direction.

The addition of barley is key to the taste of the product, smoothing out the taste, he said. The P.E.I. Brewing Company is providing Purity with the oat-barley extract for the beverages.

Dairy will remain the primary focus of the company, but Cullen said it is working on more plant-based products to be launched in the future.

The oat-barley milk is now available through some independent retailers, but Cullen says they hope to get into grocery stores very soon.

More from CBC P.E.I.

With files from Island Morning

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