PEI

P.E.I. pulls out of Supreme Court of Canada case over federal carbon tax

The P.E.I. government will no longer be an intervenor in the Supreme Court of Canada case over the federal carbon tax.

New Brunswick now the only Atlantic province involved in the case

During the P.E.I.'s sitting of the legislature this summer, Premier Dennis King defended the province's notice to intervene.  (CBC)

The P.E.I. government will no longer be an intervenor in the Supreme Court of Canada case over the federal carbon tax, set to be heard in December. 

Prince Edward Island was one of seven provinces registered as intervenors in the Saskatchewan government's challenge against the federal carbon tax. 

Saskatchewan is one of a handful of provinces opposed to the carbon tax. Saskatchewan lost in that province's Court of Appeal, and is taking its case to the Supreme Court of Canada. Ontario's courts have also upheld Ottawa's right to put a price on carbon.

During the sitting of the legislature this summer, P.E.I. Premier Dennis King defended the province's notice to intervene. 

"In this particular case, we're just reserving the right to participate, if we need to at some point. In no way, shape or form should anyone suggest that we are joining [the fight against the carbon tax], because we're absolutely not," he said. 

In a statement to CBC News on Friday, a government spokesperson wrote, "As the Premier previously stated, the notice of intervention provided P.E.I. the opportunity to review the various implications. After careful review, government legal services have come to the determination and recommendation to withdraw our notice of intervention effective Aug. 30, 2019."

By way of explanation, the government wrote, "Government must always do its due diligence as these types of important decisions have a direct impact on Islanders."  

New Brunswick is now the only Atlantic province involved in the case.

The Supreme Court of Canada is expected to hear the challenge in December. 

More P.E.I. news

With files from Steve Bruce

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