Province House won't reopen until 2020, says Parks Canada

The $41-million renovation of P.E.I.’s Province House could take up to two years longer than expected.

$41-million project pushed back due to 'surprises,' including hidden rot

The federal government has committed $41 million to restore P.E.I.'s Province House. (Randy McAndrew/CBC)

The $41-million renovation of P.E.I.'s Province House could take up to two years longer than expected.

Work had originally been scheduled to begin on the historic Charlottetown building last August, with a completion date of 2018.

But the renos have still not begun, and the work is now not expected to be completed until 2020, said Greg Shaw, project manager for Parks Canada.

Shaw said crews have been gathering information on the condition of the building so they can properly put it to tender.

The renovation is now expected to be complete in 2020. (Randy McAndrew/CBC)

'Fiscally responsible'

"We really are focused on making sure to preserve and protect the character-defining elements of the building but at the same time that we are fiscally responsible and that we repair this building in a way that's going to be standing for future generations," he said.

We really are focused on making sure to preserve and protect the character-defining elements of the building ...– Greg Shaw

Shaw said some of the "surprises" crews found were the condition of hidden elements like the inner stone wall and rot in some of the beams.

"You don't really know until you take a wall down to see what's in there," he said.

Work done in two phases

Shaw said the renovations will be done in two phases. Once it goes to tender, construction on phase one is expected to start early in the new year. Phase two, when the majority of the work will be happening, is expected to begin in 2018.

'Surprises' with the condition of the building have pushed off the renovations, said project manager Greg Shaw. (Randy McAndrew/CBC)

Province House was built in 1847. It belongs to the province of P.E.I. but is maintained and operated as a national historic site by Parks Canada. The federal government is investing $41 million in the restoration.

With files from Nicole Williams