PEI

Progress Pride flag flying on P.E.I. honours more communities, social movements

A different looking rainbow flag is being flown in some places during the P.E.I. Pride Festival this year.

Black, Indigenous, people of colour and trans communities represented on progress Pride flag

Tyler Murnaghan, a member of the Pride P.E.I. board, says its important to represent as many people as possible on the flag. (Jane Robertson/CBC)

A different looking rainbow flag is being flown in some places during the P.E.I. Pride Festival this year.

It's known as the progress Pride flag, and it adds representation for Black, Indigenous, people of colour and trans communities.

Tyler Murnaghan of Pride P.E.I. said it was important to represent as many people as possible.

"We found with all the social movements going on right now that we really wanted to make sure that that flag was represented on P.E.I., even on the limited capacity this year due to the want for them — they are in pretty high demand right now." 

The progress Pride flag was originally designed by an American artist in 2018. It has the same rainbow colours but also includes five triangle-shaped stripes to represent the Black, Indigenous, people of colour and trans communities.

The City of Charlottetown is planning to add new representation to its rainbow crosswalk next year. (Jane Robertson/CBC)

The flag has gained so much popularity around the world that Pride P.E.I. bought the last stock from its supplier.

The provincial government, the City of Charlottetown and the City of Summerside have agreed to fly the new flag.

"We are a pretty diverse community," said Summerside Mayor Basil Stewart. "When I was asked to raise the flag, I said, 'Sure, we are honoured to do that and support it.'"

The new flag design may also inspire changes to existing pride displays.

Murnaghan, TD Bank branch manager Jeff Likely, Coun. Alanna Jankov and Charlottetown Mayor Philip Brown raise the new Pride flag on Monday. (Jane Robertson/CBC)

Charlottetown Mayor Philip Brown said the city plans to make adjustments to the painted crosswalk at Grafton and Queen streets, which currently has two patterns, one representing the trans community and the other the traditional rainbow.

"Next year we'll see an amalgamation or incorporation of all the representations that are flown today on this new flag that has been raised."

The traditional rainbow flag is still being used in many places as well.

The Pride festival continues on P.E.I. with a mix of online and in-person events until Aug 2.

More from CBC P.E.I.

With files from John Robertson

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