PEI

Pig adopted by group of Island vegetarians, now looking for more permanent home

A group of Island vegetarians has adopted a pig after a local farmer posted the animal for free on Kijiji. 

'He's very friendly so far. He loves getting scratches.'

A group of Island vegetarians has adopted Prince after a local farmer posted the animal for free on Kijiji. (Isabella Zavarise/CBC)

A group of Island vegetarians has adopted a pig after a local farmer could no longer afford to keep him.

Julianna Chaulk immediately contacted the farmer after seeing the ad for the free pig.

She said the farmer no longer had any use for the two-and-a-half year old she's named Prince.

"Not many farm animals are offered for free and it's not really a position that many vegans and sanctuaries are comfortable with — to pay for an animal from a farmer," she said.

"It feels amazing to be able to do this for a pig."

Chaulk, along with some friends she met in an online Facebook group for vegetarians and vegans on P.E.I., helped move Prince to a barn just outside of Charlottetown that a farmer is allowing them to use.

'He was so happy'

Chaulk said others have contributed to help pay for Prince's bedding and food.

"We have over $500 so far and that is so amazing in such a short amount of time."

The group hopes to raise more money for his continuing care, and to put up a fence so he can enjoy the outdoors.

Julianna Chaulk, along with Brittany Stephen and Emily Brown helped to facilitate the move. All three met online in a Facebook group for vegetarians and vegans on P.E.I. (Isabella Zavarise/CBC)

Chaulk said transporting Prince was an impressive feat. 

"The farmer had … trouble trying to get him in the trailer as he is a big, seven to eight hundred pound pig. And they … don't do what they don't want to do."

"He was very nervous to get in the trailer … but as soon as he got in the stall in the barn, he was so happy and he's been great since."

Temporary home

She said despite his size, he's a sweet animal. 

"Of course we're always going to be cautious around him because he is a big pig … but he's very friendly so far. He loves getting scratches."

'Not many farm animals are offered for free and it's not really a position that many vegans and sanctuaries are comfortable with — to pay for an animal from a farmer,' said Chaulk. (Isabella Zavarise/CBC)

Prince seems to be adjusting well to the move, digging deep into a feed barrel of apples and bananas, and playfully scratching his head against the gate of his enclosure.

But the barn he calls home now is just a temporary one.

Chaulk said a number of volunteers, including herself, are helping to care for him until a more permanent home is found. 

"We are looking for anybody who is knowledgeable about pigs and has the area and structure to be able to take him."

Chaulk said she hopes other people start to look at pigs the way they do dogs and cats. 

"They're all the same. They're all domesticated animals that all deserve a happy life," she said. 

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