PEI

Ottawa inks $35M deal with P.E.I. to help pay prescription drug costs

The federal government is pledging $35 million to help Islanders pay the cost of prescription drugs.

Province will receive funding over next 4 years

'This will enable P.E.I. to have the money and the commitment to continue to have the reforms it needs to make sure ... people aren't denied access to medication,' says federal Health Minister Patty Hajdu. (Brian Higgins/CBC)

The federal government is pledging $35 million to help Islanders pay the cost of prescription drugs.

The province will receive the funding over the next four years to add new drugs to the list of those covered by the province and lower out-of-pocket costs for drugs already covered.

Ottawa says the list of drugs currently being covered by the province is less comprehensive than those in the rest of Atlantic Canada.

"P.E.I. has one of the most complicated landscapes in terms of public plans and a lot of complexity in how people are accessing drugs," said federal Health Minister Patty Hajdu, who was in the province to announce the agreement.

"This will enable P.E.I. to have the money and the commitment to continue to have the reforms it needs to make sure ... people aren't denied access to medication."

The pledge comes amid mounting speculation the Liberals will call an election this fall.

In a news release, the federal government called it "the first agreement to accelerate the implementation of national universal pharmacare."

The federal government will use the deal with P.E.I. to inform pharmacare implementation in the rest of Canada, the release said.

More from CBC P.E.I.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now