PEI

Islander hopes to see COVID-19 vaccination prioritized for pregnant people

Alexandra Taylor is 29 weeks pregnant and says she plans to get the COVID-19 vaccine as soon as it is available to her.

'I really hope they consider adding pregnant people to the next round'

Pregnancy now makes people eligible for a vaccine in New Brunswick, but P.E.I. has yet to follow suit. (Dragan Grkic/Shutterstock)

A pregnant woman on P.E.I. is hoping to get vaccinated soon.

Alexandra Taylor is 29 weeks pregnant and says she plans to get the COVID-19 vaccine as soon as it is available to her.

"Honestly I would take it anywhere. I'd take the vaccine on the beach. I would take the vaccine in a hospital setting, obviously masked, anywhere, my front yard, anywhere," she said.

Taylor said she is concerned after seeing many pregnant people in Ontario getting sick with COVID-19.

Toronto doctors have said pregnant people are getting sicker and ending up in ICUs.

The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada has called on all provinces to prioritize vaccinations for pregnant women.

'I'm really hoping to hear they prioritize pregnant people,' says Alexandra Taylor. (Tony Davis/CBC)

Pregnancy now makes people eligible for a vaccine in New Brunswick, but P.E.I. has yet to follow suit.

In an email provincial officials said, "Pregnant and breastfeeding women may want to contact their prenatal care provider to assist in making decisions weighing the risks and benefits, so that they might arrive at a well informed decision that is right for them as an individual."

Taylor said she hopes the province prioritizes pregnant women for the vaccine.

"I really hope they consider adding pregnant people to the next round, or within the next few rounds at least," she said. "I'm really hoping to hear they prioritize pregnant people."

'While we are safe at the time, it doesn't take much,' says Taylor. (File photo from Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

She believes getting vaccinated is much less risky than worrying about getting COVID-19.

"Before I had my first born, I lost several pregnancies. I know what it's like to miscarry even though you tried everything to stay pregnant," she said.

"As a result, I am not one who goes through pregnancy without caution, pregnancies are pretty scary for me. And that said this doesn't feel like a risk, getting a vaccine while pregnant. It really just feels like an added layer of protection."

She moved to P.E.I. from Montreal a few years ago. She said a majority of her friends and family live in the city — and some of them have been sick with COVID-19.

"They've experienced a very different pandemic than we have here. So I know the reality of what it can be like. And while we are safe at the time, it doesn't take much."

Answering an audience question on Cross Country Checkup at the end of March, Dr. Alex Wong noted that there is data that suggests once you're vaccinated and have antibodies against COVID-19, you can pass that on to your newborn through breastfeeding. 

"It's like you are vaccinating two people instead of one," Taylor said.

"I would love to give that start to my newborn."

More from CBC P.E.I.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Tony Davis grew up on P.E.I. and studied journalism at Holland College. He can be contacted at anthony.davis@cbc.ca

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