PEI

Pastor says she was 'plate shamed' for having N.S. licence plates

An Island resident says she's disappointed after discovering a nasty note on the windshield of her car — and she thinks it was left there by someone who didn't like her licence plates.

'We do live here,' says Miriam Leslie, Charlottetown Community Church Pastor

Leslie says she has lived on P.E.I. for almost a year, but the car is leased through her work office in Halifax which is why it has a Nova Scotia plate. (Brian Higgins/CBC)

An Island resident says she's disappointed after discovering a nasty note on the windshield of her car — and she thinks it was left there by someone who didn't like her licence plates.

Miriam Leslie's car has licence plates from Nova Scotia.

She said was visiting friends near Lloyd Inman Memorial Park in Canoe Cove with her husband and two daughters last week. She said they had been enjoying the scenery, but that quickly changed when they returned to their car and found a note tucked under the windshield wiper. 

"Go the bleep back to the mainland," Leslie said, reading what was written on the note. 

"I'm presuming that they assumed that we were visiting, that we didn't live here on the Island. We've lived here for almost a year," Leslie said.

Leslie said she and her husband are pastors at the Charlottetown Community Church and work for the Salvation Army on P.E.I.

She said she thinks this was a case of what she called "plate shaming."

'I worried a little bit'

Leslie said her car is leased through the Salvation Army office in Halifax and that's the reason behind the out-of-province plates.

She said the car is marked with a Salvation Army parking pass with the red shield hanging on the rearview mirror. 

"Honestly, it's something I worried a little bit about because I've heard about this kind of thing and I have a little, not a lot of anxiety, but we're doing the staycation thing this summer so I do worry a little bit that it may happen again as we travel the Island — but hopefully not."

Leslie said she understands the stress the pandemic has caused and she would have liked to talk with the person who left it to explain her situation.  

Miriam Leslie says she found this note on her windshield and thinks it is a result of her vehicle having a Nova Scotia licence plate. (Submitted by Miriam Leslie)

Travel restriction stress

On Tuesday, Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Heather Morrison addressed concerns about out-of-province licence plates during her afternoon briefing. 

She said there are a variety of reasons people could be driving on P.E.I. and reminded the public of those who are essential workers, new residents or those visiting for compassionate reasons. 

"It's tied into making sure we're doing the best things we can and practicing these public health measures without always being concerned about the licence plate on somebody's car," Morrison said. 

Leslie did not report the incident to authorities but said she is somewhat worried this may happen again as she and her family travel throughout the Island. 

"The thing that keeps coming back to us is what Dr. Morrison says: to be patient and to be kind," said Leslie.

"You can't assume that because you see an out-of-province licence plate, there could be a million different stories." 

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With files by Brian Higgins

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