PEI

Most university graduates pursuing further education, study finds

Recent Maritime university graduates are finding a bachelor’s degree is not enough, according to a study of the class of 2012 by the Maritime Province Higher Education Commission.

Job requirement top reason for going back to school

Science students were most likely to go back to school. (Shane Ross/CBC)

Recent Maritime university graduates are finding a bachelor's degree is not enough, according to a study of the class of 2012 by the Maritime Province Higher Education Commission.

The study, released Tuesday, found 65 per cent of that class undertook further post-secondary studies after completing their bachelor's degree.

Science and math graduates were most likely to further their education, 84 per cent of them, followed by humanities and social sciences, and then commerce and applied arts and sciences.

Three quarters of the graduates went back to school because it was necessary for their jobs. Only about 15 per cent said it was about self-improvement or learning more about a subject.

Most went back to university, with only about one in six going to college or into an apprenticeship program. Close to half of those surveyed started a graduate degree.

The number of graduates who pursued further education aligns closely with a previous study by MPHEC of the high school graduating class of '14. It found that 65 per cent of those starting university intended to continue their studies beyond a bachelor's degree.

The survey included 1,901 graduates. It is considered accurate within 2.2 percentage points 19 times out of 20.

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