PEI

Keep seasonal residents out until hospital, nursing home visitor restrictions lifted, says Liberal MLA  

There are more calls for government to reverse its decision to let in seasonal residents while there are still visiting restrictions at long-term care facilities and hospitals.

Asks if 'care of our most vulnerable islanders or the vacation rights of non-residents?' is more important

MLA Hal Perry says he's heard from a number of constituents who find the decision to let in seasonal residents unfair while visiting restrictions are in place at long-term care facilities and hospitals. (Brian McInnis/CBC)

There are more calls for government to reverse its decision to let in seasonal residents while there are still visiting restrictions at long-term care facilities and hospitals.

The call came from Liberal MLA Hal Perry during Wednesday's emergency sitting of the legislature.

Perry said he's heard from a number of constituents who find the decision to let in seasonal residents unfair while there are visiting restrictions still in place.

Right now, patients in hospitals and people in long-term care facilities can have two designated visitors come see them. Those in end-of-life care can have six.

All visits will be for a maximum of one hour, with the exception of those visiting patients near the end of life, and physical distancing requirements must be maintained,

But Perry said the province should "reverse the decision to opening the bridge until Island seniors and those in hospitals and care facilities are able to visit family members without being forced to choose between their loved ones." 

"What is more important to you, the comfort and care of our most vulnerable Islanders or the vacation rights of non-residents?" Perry asked.

No commitment to reverse decision

King said he did not feel the two issues were connected, but he knows the last few months have been difficult for Island seniors and patients.

Defending the restrictions, King said the province "needed to take measures in the time of a worldwide health pandemic to keep our seniors safe and as of June 3rd today, we have kept them safe and I'm immensely proud for that."

"Part of the job as premier is if some people have to be mad at you. I'd rather them be mad at me for this than to have to stand here and try to justify the deaths of our precious Island seniors," he said.

King did not commit to reversing the decision to let in seasonal residents but pointed to a number of requirements in place to minimize the risk of an outbreak of COVID-19 cases on P.E.I.

Seasonal residents will be required to self-isolate for two weeks upon arrival and have a support plan. 

King said those people will be tested before they leave isolation and will be contacted every day to make sure they are following the rules.

More from CBC P.E.I. 

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