PEI

3 Islanders make list of top-25 powerful business women in Atlantic Canada

Jenene Wooldridge is one of three Islanders to make the list of top-25 powerful business women in Atlantic Canada.

'It’s really one thing to do the work, but to be recognized for it is another thing'

Jenene Wooldridge is the executive director of L’nuey. (Buffie Boily)

Jenene Wooldridge is one of three Islanders to make the list of top-25 powerful business women in Atlantic Canada.

She's the executive director of L'nuey — taking the lead role in negotiations between the Mi'kmaq and the government on constitutional rights — and it is the first person to lead the organization.

She said she didn't know she had been nominated and was surprised when she was named to the Atlantic Business Magazine list.

"It was quite a shock to have that released on International Women's Day. It was even more impactful, I think," Wooldridge said.

"It's really one thing to do the work, but to be recognized for it is another thing, right, so it was quite an honour."

Wooldridge said she was surprised to be recognized. (John Robertson/CBC)

Wooldridge said she tries to be respectful, inclusive and decisive in her role as a leader. She said she is "shocked" to be recognized among many other influential business women.

"I don't know if powerful is the word that I would use to describe myself, but it is what it is in this situation. I am grouped with 25 powerhouse women," she said.

Everyone has a role to play in increasing the number of women in leadership positions, Wooldridge said.

"We have an opportunity and it's really an opportunity to do better. To increase opportunities, remove cultural or gender blinders or obstacles that are in the way and empower women," she said.

Dr. Heather Morrison also made the list, as the province's chief public health officer, and the province's first woman to become a Rhodes Scholar. (CBC)

Wooldridge said her work with L'nuey will continue with increasing the understanding of Mi'kmaw culture across P.E.I.

"This week I will complete the director Rotman School of Management as a step toward becoming a certified corporate director," she said. "And this fall I am actually publishing a planner. It is a weekly undated planner based on living your life based on balance and intention."

Two other Island women were also named to the list. Mary Robinson, the first woman to become president of the Canadian Federation of Agriculture, and a manager partner of a sixth-generation family farm.

Dr. Heather Morrison also made the list, as the province's chief public health officer, and the province's first woman to become a Rhodes Scholar.

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