PEI

P.E.I. surpasses goal for keeping international grads on the Island

P.E.I. had a successful 2018 in its efforts to find permanent, full-time work for graduating international students.

15 per cent of 2018 international graduates have found work on P.E.I.

Elizabeth Iwunwa, centre, graduated from UPEI this year and is working in retail. (UPEI)

P.E.I. had a successful 2018 in its efforts to find permanent, full-time work for graduating international students.

Corey Frizell has been working as an international student employer liaison officer, a position funded by the federal and provincial governments.

Frizell said the province set a target of finding permanent, full-time work for 10 per cent of graduating international students in 2018 and 38, about 15 per cent, found positions.

The graduates are working in sectors all across the economy, he said: environmental technology, fish plants, call centres, civil service, banking, retail, childcare.

Working, but also back to school

Nigerian Elizabeth Iwunwa just got her BA and is working a retail job.

She's decided to go back to school and get her MBA at UPEI. She'd like to stay on P.E.I., but it all depends on finding meaningful work.

'Even if it's something small, but if it's in my field, and there are opportunities for advancement, then yes, of course,' Elizabeth Iwunwa says. (Laura Chapin/CBC)

"Even if it's something small, but if it's in my field, and there are opportunities for advancement, then yes, of course," said Iwunwa.

"I know people with engineering degrees or with some very big, smart degrees who are working call centres or doing retail for years, and while that's honest labour and there's dignity in that, I don't know that that's what I want for myself."

Frizell said not all the 38 students are working in their field of choice, but work continues to get them the jobs they want so they'll stay.

More P.E.I. news

With files from Laura Chapin

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

now