PEI

Province wants to plant more hedgerows across the Island

The province is looking for new clients to participate in its hedgerow planting program.

'We want to help landowners to plant trees that protect the soil from rain erosion, wind erosion'

Since the hedgerow planting program began, the province has planted more than 800,000 trees across the Island. (Submitted by PEI Forests, Fish and Wildlife)

The province is looking for new clients to participate in its hedgerow planting program.

It wants to make sure people are aware of the program, as it prepares for planting in 2018. The program is for homeowners, farmers and business owners who want to plant trees around their properties.

"We want to help landowners to plant trees that protect the soil from rain erosion, wind erosion. We want to create sound buffers for them. We want to help reduce energy costs for heating in the winter time, or cooling in the summertime, and just to create a more beautiful landscape on Prince Edward Island," said Ken Mayhew, the information officer with Forests, Fish and Wildlife — the department that runs the program.

"Hedgerows are a very integral part of the Island's landscape," he added.

A dollar a tree

To qualify, Islanders must have a site where there's potential to plant at least 300 trees. If approved, the province does the planting for approximately a dollar a tree.

Landowners participating in the hedgerow program must protect the trees for at least 15 years. (Submitted by PEI Forests, Fish and Wildlife)

After the trees are planted, the province follows up with the landowners to check on the survival of the trees. If the trees die, the province will often replace those seedlings — so long as the mortality was not the result of the landowner's actions, Mayhew explained.

The province has been doing this since around 2005. To date, they've had approximately 2000 participants and have planted more than 800,000 trees across the Island. 

"We're just encouraging more people to sign up. Love to see trees being planted in the beautiful Prince Edward Island," Mayhew said.

Participating landowners must agree to protect the trees for at least 15 years.

More information is available on the province's website

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