PEI

Heritage group hopes to preserve historic estate, brick by brick

The heritage trust trying to save the Glenaladale estate, built in the late 1880s in Tracadie Bay, has launched a Buy a Brick campaign to encourage Islanders to invest in the property.

Campaign launched to purchase Glenaladale estate and turn it into a small conference/ education centre

There have been four houses on Glenaladale estate. The current brick mansion was built in 1883. (Submitted by Mary MacDonald-Gallant)

The heritage trust trying to preserve the Glenaladale estate, built in the late 1880s in Tracadie Bay, has launched a Buy a Brick campaign to encourage Islanders to invest in the property.

The group says it has until March 31 to raise another $700,000 it needs to buy the three-storey brick home, which it hopes to turn into a small conference/ education centre.

The Buy a Brick campaign will launch at a ceilidh at the Tracadie Cross Rec Centre on Jan. 21. The bricks are $25 each.

The historic home sits on 214 hectares by Tracadie Bay on P.E.I.'s north shore. (Submitted by Mary MacDonald-Gallant)

Mary MacDonald-Gallant of the heritage trust told CBC Mainstreet's Angela Walker the property is a great reflection of P.E.I. history and cultures.

"The Mi'kmaq, it was the good camping ground for them, that area. There was a French home, a settlement on there at one time," she said.

Sold to MacKinnons in 1905

"Scots, of course, came in 1772. Captain John's (MacDonald) son, Father John, brought out the Irish in the 1830s."

The MacDonalds were heavily involved in agriculture, she said.

Two familes have owned the Glenaladale estate: the MacDonalds and the MacKinnons. (Submitted by Mary MacDonald-Gallant)

In 1905, they sold the property to the MacKinnons, who were fox farmers.

It has been in the MacKinnon family ever since, but they currently have it up for sale.

The ceilidh concert for the Buy a Brick begins at 7:30 on Jan. 21. It features Eddy Quinn, John Webster and Mike Pendergast. For more information, call 902-676-2123.

With files from CBC P.E.I.'s Mainstreet

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