PEI

Charges in P.E.I. fish kill dropped due to possible 'interpretation of label' of fungicide

The "possible differences of interpretation of the label" on a fungicide is the reason charges were dropped in a fish kill that happened in Western P.E.I. last August.

More than 900 fish died in the Little Miminegash River in August 2016

Some of the dead fish that were collected at the Roseville watershed site. (Submitted by Danny Murphy)

The "possible differences of interpretation of the label" on a fungicide is the reason charges were dropped in a fish kill that happened in Western P.E.I. last August.

On Aug. 22, 2016 more than 900 dead fish were collected on The Little Miminegash River, near Roseville, P.E.I. In addition two dead cormorants were found downstream and a dead great blue heron was found upstream from the fish kill area.

Charges were laid under the provincial Pesticides Control Act, citing a fungicide application infraction, but later dropped.

Seeking more clarity around frequency of application

"The Crown, with the support of Conservation, later determined there was not enough evidence to lead to a conviction due to possible differences of interpretation of the label on the fungicide, so the charges were dropped," the Department Justice and Public Safety told CBC in an email.

The fungicide that was used in this case was Chlorothalonil. The province has asked the federal Pesticide Regulatory Management Agency for more clarity around the interpretation of the label, and what it says regarding the frequency of application. 

The department said in the last five years there has not been another case of charges being laid and dropped for a Chlorothalonil label infraction.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Natalia Goodwin

Video Journalist

Natalia is a multi-platform journalist in Ottawa. She has also worked for CBC in P.E.I. and Newfoundland and Labrador.

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