PEI·Photos

A drone's eye view of Fiona damage at P.E.I. National Park

Fiona's footprint is obvious in images CBC drone videographer Shane Hennessey captured at the national park on P.E.I.'s North Shore on Sept. 28, 2022. 

Trees down, roads undermined, beaches realigned — but a lighthouse is unscathed

The iconic lighthouse at Covehead stands untouched by the storm. (Shane Hennessey/CBC)

Prince Edward Island National Park is no stranger to storm damage. It took well over a year to clean up trees downed by Dorian near Cavendish Campground in 2019. 

But the storm surge that accompanied post-tropical storm Fiona took it to a whole new level. 

Below are images CBC drone videographer Shane Hennessey captured at the park on P.E.I.'s North Shore on Sept. 28, 2022. 

A boardwalk to nowhere: The waves broke off the rest of this structure leading to the beach at Stanhope. (Shane Hennessey/CBC)
Storm-force winds from the north flattened trees along the Gulf Shore Parkway in P.E.I. National Park. (Shane Hennessey/CBC)
Another view of the downed trees. (Shane Hennessey/CBC)
The storm surge pulled a huge amount of sand from sand dunes into the water along P.E.I.'s North Shore. At least for now, it means people will wade out a lot longer before the water gets deep. (Shane Hennessey/CBC)
A different angle showing the destruction at Stanhope Beach. (Shane Hennessey/CBC)
More evidence of heavy erosion at P.E.I. National Park just east of the Stanhope main beach. (Shane Hennessey/CBC)
The road by the famous hotel at Dalvay, P.E.I., was undermined by Fiona's storm surge. (Shane Hennessey/CBC)
Covehead Bridge is intact but erosion is visible on the road verges leading out to it. (Shane Hennessey/CBC)
A crumbled shoreline with only heavier blocks of sandstone left. (Shane Hennessey/CBC)

Photos by CBC's Shane Hennessey

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