PEI

'Something has to be done': Fate of historic P.E.I. church in question

The future of Holy Trinity Anglican Church in Georgetown, P.E.I., is in question.

'It's one of the oldest churches on Prince Edward Island'

The church was originally built in 1842 but it hasn't been used in several years. (Pat Martel/CBC)

The future of Holy Trinity Anglican Church in Georgetown, P.E.I., is in question.

The church was originally built in 1842 but it hasn't been used in several years, said Edward MacAulay, mayor of Three Rivers.

The building is one of four properties in the municipality considered to be derelict, he said. The owners of all four properties are being given final notice that they must repair the properties or they will be torn down, he said.

'A shame'

Seeing the historic structure being torn down would be a shame, MacAulay said.

"You know, it's historic. It's one of the oldest churches on Prince Edward Island. The church itself has slowly been getting weaker and weaker and now it's a safety issue," MacAulay said.  

"But I think the writing is on the wall right now, that something has to be done because ... it's definitely a safety issue."

The property owners have until July 5 to respond to the municipality with their plans, MacAulay said.

No buyers

The church building went to tax sale ahead of the recent provincial election but no one bought it, said Steven Myers, minister of transportation and infrastructure and MLA for the area.

A view of the roof of Holy Trinity Anglican Church in Georgetown. This photo was taken in February 2017. (Pat Martel/CBC)

Because no one moved to buy the property, the building is now technically owned by the province, Myers said.

In the past, Myers said, a local community group had expressed interest in restoring the building.

He recently reached out to the organization to see if they are still interested.

'A viable solution'

While there wouldn't be much available through his own department, Myers said, he would be willing to lend a helping hand in the process of restoring the church building.

"I'd be able to help kind of direct them as the local MLA. I'll direct them to some of the places where we might find funding partners to help both save the building and make it a viable solution for the community," Myers said.

In the meantime, Myers has spoken with staff and signs will be put up to make the property as safe as possible for the public while the next steps for the building are determined.

More P.E.I. news

With files from Angela Walker

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.