PEI

P.E.I. farmer showing off crops from a whole new angle

A P.E.I. farmer is taking stunning images of his potato field to show people where their food comes from — from a whole new aerial angle.

Farmer captures eye-catching images with drone

An aerial shot from a drone of barley being cut on a farm in eastern P.E.I. (Brad Robertson/Facebook)

A P.E.I. farmer is taking stunning images of his fields to show people where their food comes from — from a whole new aerial angle. 

Brad Robertson, 26, started capturing the birds-eye-view pictures and video when his father received a drone for Christmas. Robertson borrowed it and started experimenting at his farm in East Point, P.E.I., where he grows mostly potatoes. 

"Hopefully some people that don't know much about farming can see them and realize what we do and how much work goes into it," said Robertson. 

It really is quite amazing, like even I'm sometimes shocked.— Brad Robertson

Robertson said he's probably not as technically savvy as most 26-year-olds, but that the drone is very easy to use. He gets lots of retweets and positive comments when he posts.

A photo of a farm in eastern P.E.I. from a birds-eye-view. (Brad Robertson/Facebook)

'We live in such a beautiful place'

"We live in such a beautiful place, you can pretty much take a picture anywhere here, especially from the air and it just looks so nice and people seem to really like it," said Robertson.

"I like seeing other people do the same thing so I figured why not show them to everyone." 

Farmer Brad Robertson took this picture of his fields with a drone. (Brad Robertson/Facebook)

"All the colours and everything, it really is quite amazing, like even I'm sometimes shocked when I put them on the computer and see them myself, just how good they do turn out," said Robertson. 

Not just pretty pictures

The P.E.I. Potato Board said it's seen some other farmers starting to use drones or UAVs as well, but not only for photographs.

Farmers are using drones to get a better sense of the status and health of their crop — as opposed to walking the field. They can see the whole field from above to identify issues with crop fertility, nutrient availability, and plant. 

Technology serving multiple purposes

"Not only does it have a scientific and an agronomic benefit, but if it can also be used to show a little bit more, how we farm, how our farmers you know manage their fields," said Ryan Barrett, research coordinator for the P.E.I. Potato Board.

"I think there's definitely a value to that," said Barrett.  

Robertson hopes to do more before and after pictures of his fields next year. 

Island farmer Brad Robertson captured this photo while experimenting with a drone. (Brad Robertson/Facebook)

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