PEI

What P.E.I. residents should put in emergency kits

With Prince Edward Island expected to be impacted by Hurricane Dorian, the province and the City of Charlottetown are reminding residents of the importance of having a 72-hour emergency-preparedness plan.

Ahead of Hurricane Dorian, Islanders are reminded to have a 72-hour plan

People should have a 72-hour emergency kit and share its location with everyone in the home or business. (CBC)

With Prince Edward Island expected to be impacted by Hurricane Dorian, the province and the City of Charlottetown are reminding residents of the importance of having a 72-hour emergency-preparedness plan.

Environment Canada has warned that severe winds and rainfall could have major impacts for P.E.I. with most regions in the Maritimes experiencing some tropical storm force winds over the weekend.

It's important Islanders and visitors are prepared for emergencies year-round for things such as hurricanes, flooding and other events that could cause a loss of electricity, city officials said in a release.

People should have a 72-hour emergency kit and share its location with everyone in the home or business, the release said.

Here is a list of suggested items to put into an emergency kit.

1. Food and water

Prepare a three to seven day supply of water and non-perishable food items such as dried and canned foods, and don't forget a manual can opener. 

Make a family emergency plan and prepare an emergency kit together. Don't forget to plan for your pets by buying food and water to last them a few days also. 

Keep your pet inside during severe weather and never leave a pet outside or tethered during a storm, a release from the province said.

2. Medicine

Jason Johnston, pharmacy manager at Murphy's Queen Street Pharmacy, says it is 'good planning' to refill prescriptions ahead of a storm system. (Sam Juric/CBC)

Have prescription and non-prescription medicines, a fully stocked first aid kit on hand as well as toiletries and some hand sanitizer to cut down on water use.

"If the storm is coming and the power goes out pharmacies may not be open, so it is a friendly reminder just to make sure that all of your medications are up to date and that you have pills to get through the weather," said Jason Johnston pharmacy manager at Murphy's Queen Street Pharmacy.

Usually ahead of storms Johnston sees a lot of people come in to refill their prescriptions.

"That's just good planning on their part," he said.

3.  Baby supplies

Parents should grab some essentials for newborns or young family members to last a 72-hour span. (Africa Studio/Shutterstock)

Those with newborns or young children should have a 72-hour supply of formula, diapers and other essential baby supplies on hand.

4. Light and communication

With the possibly of electricity going out make sure to get stocked up on batteries. (Melanie Ferrier/CBC)

Have extra batteries for flashlights and radios to hear any emergency updates.

Make sure there are candles as well as matches or a lighter in your home and charge up those cell phones.

Jamie Lewis is the manager at Home Hardware in Charlottetown and said when storms are about to hit the store sells a lot of "emergency power failure items.

Jamie Lewis is the manager at Home Hardware in Charlottetown and says some people wait last minute to stock their emergency kits. (Sam Juric/CBC)

"Like candles, lamps, batteries, flashlights those kind of things are part of the big sellers for us," he said.

Usually the store stays stocked on those items, but they can get low if a storm forms in short notice, Lewis said, and some people wait until last minute to buy items.

"I know everybody should have an emergency preparedness kit in their homes, not everybody does. They wait until they need it to get it for sure," he said.

5. Evacuation

Have cash on hand in case there is an evacuation and debit machines are unavailable. (Mark Blinch/Reuters)

Prepare blankets and a change of clothing for each member of the home and have cash on hand in case of an evacuation.

The federal government has released a list of items to include when preparing an emergency storm kit. Those headed to stores to stock up could print the list and check items off as they go. (Sam Juric/CBC)

More P.E.I. news

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