PEI

East Royalty waste water now treated at Charlottetown plant

Waste water generated in East Royalty is now treated at the Charlottetown treatment facility, city officials say. 

Officials said the city has plans to restore the East Royalty site to parkland

Officials said the process of diverting the waste water from the East Royalty site began in early December and was completed in early January.  (Natalia Goodwin/CBC )

The East Royalty sewage and treatment lagoon has been decommissioned, city officials say, and waste water generated in the Charlottetown neighbourhood is now treated at the city's treatment facility. 

Officials said the process of diverting the waste water from the East Royalty site began in early December and was completed in early January. 

That waste water will now be pumped from the area of the former lagoon to the treatment plant located on Riverside Drive. 

"This project now reduces the overall impact on the environment and it ensures sustainable waste-water treatment in the future for residents of East Royalty," said Coun. Jason Coady, chair of the city's water and sewer utility committee. 

'Responsible thing to do'

The East Royalty lagoon was built in 1987 and serviced more than 1,600 people, a release from the city said. It discharged to Wrights Creek.

Officials said the city plans to restore the East Royalty site to parkland. 

"It's just the responsible thing to do for the environment," Coady said. "We have a plant in place already and we want maximize the use of that plant. So closing this down in East Royalty just made sense for everyone involved."

The federal government contributed $1.92 million for the construction of a sewer lift station and force main. The province and city each contributed more than $962,000. 

Upgrades to the gravity lines leading to the Charlottetown treatment plant were paid for through $2.2 million from the federal government and $1.1 million each from the province and city.

More P.E.I. news

With files from Angela Walker

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