PEI

DiverseCity Multicultural Festival shows changing face of P.E.I.

The 10th annual DiverseCity Multicultural Street Festival featured about 60 cultures.

'It's really a reflection of how much more diversity there is here now,' says organizer

Nana Yasuda was displaying her Japanese culture at the DiverseCity festival on Sunday in Charlottetown. (Krystalle Ramlakhan/CBC)

The changing face of Prince Edward Island was proudly on display Sunday in Charlottetown.

The 10th annual DiverseCity Multicultural Street Festival featured about 60 cultures.

Thousands of people packed Queen Street in downtown Charlottetown for the 10th annual DiverseCity festival. (Krystalle Ramlakhan/CBC)

"It's really a reflection of how much more diversity there is here now," said festival co-manager Mark Carr-Rollit. "I've been here 18 years and I've seen a big increase."

He said events like DiverseCity help people feel more connected to the community.

Hammad Ahmed wanted to show the love and peace of the Muslim culture. (Krystalle Ramlakhan/CBC)

"The more people feel connected to their community, the more likely they are to stay," he said.

Hammad Ahmed, with Muslim Youth PEI, said the festival important because it allows people to experience the different cultures for themselves.

"As you see in the news, we don't have the best reputation," he said. "We're trying to fix it. So the best way to fix it is by showing them ... our love and peace."

The event, which features food, art, and dress, will also be held in Montague and Summerside later this summer.

Buddhist monks from Little Sands participated in the DiverseCity festival. (Krystalle Ramlakhan/CBC)
Ashley Perry arranges the jewelry in her Jamaican booth on Sunday. (Krystalle Ramlakhan/CBC)

With files from Krystalle Ramlakhan

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