PEI

P.E.I. company sets up free charging stations at QEH

Cory Rusk knows what it is like to wait in the emergency room, he has had some long waits taking his own children in.

'I have seen it in the mall and other locations like this, but nothing within the hospital'

Device Doctors donated chargers to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital emergency room about a month ago. (Mike MacDonald/QEH)

Cory Rusk knows what it is like to wait in the emergency room, he has had some long waits with his own children.

"Four to five hours and you know you look at your phone and see the battery has gone down, and you look around and see there is no place to charge it," said the owner-operator of Device Doctors.

Now, that has changed. Device Doctors donated chargers to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital emergency room about a month ago. As people enter the emergency room there are two secured stations to the left and right where they can get a mobile device charge — for no charge.

"We donated two right now, but there are four more being placed throughout the hospital," Rusk said.

Expanding to other hospitals

Prince County Hospital has also reached out to Rusk to see if charging stations can be placed there, he said, and he plans to put four units in that hospital in about two weeks.

"The units run about $500," Rusk said.

"We're just going over details of where they are going to be located."

When you are in an emergency and going to the hospital you don't think about grabbing that cable that keeps that phone alive.— Cory Rusk, Device Doctors

The stations accommodate several different models of cellphone, Rusk said.

"When you are at the emergency and your phone dies, you know you can't talk to loved ones. Can't keep people updated and there are no pay phones there anymore. So, you have to rely on your cellphone."

Worry about life, not battery life

The feedback has been great, Rusk said.

"Answering emails, phone calls, text messages and all the other apps people use definitely takes down the battery life. And when you are in an emergency and going to the hospital you don't think about grabbing that cable that keeps that phone alive."

Rusk said the company is happy to provide the charging stations so people don't have to worry about grabbing a charger on their way out the door and can focus on their loved ones.

Hospital maintenance has made sure the devices can't be easily stolen, Rusk said.

"They're locked down to the table with a combination lock, or some are done with just a normal padlock."

Rusk said he isn't sure if other hospitals have done this, but said staff have told him the chargers are really filling a need.

"I have seen it in the mall and other locations like this, but nothing within the hospital."

More P.E.I. news

With files from Angela Walker

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