PEI

COVID-19 on P.E.I.: What's happening Wednesday, July 22

Prince Edward Island is now down to two active cases of COVID-19, out of a total of 36 diagnosed since the pandemic began. 

New Brunswick premier says Islanders needn't worry about his province opening up to 2 communities in Quebec

New signs are up on the UPEI campus, in preparation for the fall semester. (John Robertson/CBC)

Prince Edward Island is now down to two active cases of COVID-19, out of a total of 36 diagnosed since the pandemic began. 

New Brunswick Premier Blaine Higgs says Islanders needn't worry about his province opening up to two communities in Quebec.

The Canada Emergency Commercial Rent Assistance (CECRA) program is not working for some Island businesses that have been evicted during the COVID-19 pandemic, says Charlottetown MP Sean Casey.

A jobless rate for women on P.E.I. that is almost double what it is for men shows the need for structural changes to provide women with more secure jobs, says the P.E.I. Advisory Council on the Status of Women.

CHANCES daycare in Belfast is looking for a new home to avoid closing its doors Aug. 21. It was originally located at the Dr. John M. Gillis Memorial Lodge —  a long-term care home — but COVID-19 pushed it to Belfast Consolidated School. 

Ann Robertson, executive director of CHANCES, says she hopes to find a place for the Belfast daycare so it can stay open. (Travis Kingdon/CBC)

School officials on P.E.I. say they continue to work on plans for a safe return to class and hope to provide parents with details in plenty of time before the bell rings on Sept. 8.

The P.E.I. government owes Islanders and Atlantic Canadians an explanation for the private information it is collecting during the pandemic, says the Canadian Civil Liberties Association.

Also in the news

  • A 22-year-old resident of P.E.I. who tested positive for COVID-19 is facing charges in connection to allegedly failing to self-isolate.
  • Dr. Heather Morrison and Premier Dennis King gave a briefing on the coronavirus situation Tuesday, with King repeating that he was in no hurry to expand the Atlantic bubble and allow visitors from elsewhere in Canada without requiring them to self-isolate for two weeks.
  • Prince Edward Islanders, and especially young people, will be able to count on the federal government's support as the economy slowly reopens in the pandemic, says Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland.

Further resources

More COVID-19 stories from CBC P.E.I.

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