PEI

COVID-19 on P.E.I.: What's happening Monday, July 27

Maritime Electric has brought in a new COVID-19 customer support program, which is offering customers struggling because of the pandemic the option of deferring payments of their bills for a few months. 

Deferred payments program brought in for struggling Maritime Electric customers

Maritime Electric has brought in a new COVID-19 Customer Support Program, allowing customers struggling during the pandemic to apply for deferred bill payments. (Jane Robertson/CBC)

Maritime Electric has brought in a new COVID-19 customer support program, which is offering customers struggling because of the pandemic the option of deferring payments of their bills for a few months. 

This may help some residential customers who have seen as much as a 10 or 15 per cent hike on their bills since the pandemic. Power use has remained the same, but with more people working from home, residential rates have gone up, the utility says. 

The Canada Revenue Agency says it won't impose late fees for anyone who owes back taxes for the 2019 tax year until September 2020. 

The 2020 Stompin' Tom Festival is officially underway, after the centre in Skinners Pond officially opened its new stage and festival grounds specifically designed for physical distancing. The ribbon cutting was held on Saturday.

The Queen Elizabeth Hospital has eased some COVID-19 restrictions and, as of Saturday, is letting more visitors in to see patients, with two designated visitors permitted at all services within the hospital.

A group that supports breastfeeding mothers is rebranding on P.E.I. with the goal of making support more accessible and inclusive for Island parents. It has started holding meetings online due to COVID-19 restrictions.

The Island is now down to two active cases of COVID-19, out of a total of 36 diagnosed since the pandemic began. 

Also in the news

  • Many of the visitors P.E.I. welcomes every summer are not tourists in the strictest sense — they are people who used to live on the Island but moved away. With COVID-19 restricting visitors to those inside the Atlantic provinces, seasonal residents with P.E.I. property, and other Canadians who apply successfully to come to P.E.I. to support family, a lot of those expats are left out. 
  • Music venues had been shut as of mid-March due to COVID-19 restrictions, but those loosened a few weeks ago, allowing performers to once again take the stage —12 feet from the audience, and to a maximum of 50 patrons who are physically distanced from one another.
  • The P.E.I. Home and School Federation still has questions about schools reopening following two virtual town halls hosted by the Department of Education.
  • The P.E.I. government is hopeful aspects of the federal program that aims to safely reopen the economy will help women, who are much more likely than men to be unemployed in the pandemic, to get back to work.

Further resources

More COVID-19 stories from CBC P.E.I.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now