PEI

Confederation Centre gets $1.5M for Dreamcatcher project

The non-profit organization that runs Charlottetown’s Confederation Centre of the Arts is getting $1.5 million from the federal government for its Canada-wide project Dreamcatcher.

Youth from across the country to create new musical inspired by their dreams for Canada’s future

Canadian Heritage Minister Mélanie Joly says the Dreamcatcher project encourages young Canadians to share their vision for the nation’s future. (CBC)

The non-profit organization that runs Charlottetown's Confederation Centre of the Arts is getting $1.5 million from the federal government for its Canada-wide project Dreamcatcher.

With support from the Canada 150 Fund, the Fathers of Confederation Buildings Trust will engage youth from across the country to create a new musical inspired by their dreams for Canada's future.

"The Dreamcatcher project encourages young Canadians to share their vision for the nation's future through an original musical that reflects our cultural diversity," said Canadian Heritage Minister Mélanie Joly in a news release.

As part of the Dreamcatcher project, miniature dreamcatchers will be created and integrated into an immense dreamcatcher that will be on display in Charlottetown in 2017. (CBC)

Around 20 young professional artists, who reflect the country's cultural diversity, will be cast.

Participants will meet an Indigenous artist who will speak to them about the symbolic importance of dreamcatchers in Indigenous culture.

Miniature dreamcatchers will be created and integrated into an immense dreamcatcher that will be on display in Charlottetown in 2017 during the 150th anniversary of Confederation.

The government said its vision for the 150th anniversary of Confederation includes four major themes: diversity and inclusiveness, the environment, youth, and reconciliation with Indigenous peoples.

The Canada 150 Fund, established in April 2015, has an overall budget of $210 million.

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