PEI

Charlottetown mulls new bicycle lane

The city of Charlottetown is considering a bicycle and pedestrian lane that would run from the Queen Elizabeth Hospital to St. Peters Road.

Lane would be shared by both cyclists and pedestrians

'Not everybody has a car and buses don't get to every spot,' says Terry MacLeod, chair of the city's environmental and sustainability committee. (ricochet64/Shutterstock)

The city of Charlottetown is considering a bicycle and pedestrian lane that would run from the Queen Elizabeth Hospital to St. Peters Road.

The city plans to use $544,000, originally set aside for a similar project proposed for Fitzroy Street.

That project was ultimately nixed after opposition from residents and some businesses in the area.

"We felt that it would be a great project to have people from the East Royalty, Parkdale and Sherwood areas to access the hospital by walking or biking," said Terry MacLeod, chair of the city's environmental and sustainability committee. 

The lane, which would be shared by cyclists and pedestrians, will require government approval under the gas tax program, he said. 

Future plans

MacLeod is optimistic the new lane proposal will get the green light. But construction isn't likely to happen until next year, he said. 

"Not everybody has a car and buses don't get to every spot. So it's kind of nice to be able to have a multi-purpose path that will take people to where they have to go," he said. 

If the proposal gets the go-ahead, MacLeod said the hope would be to expand the lane further. 

"Down the road we're looking to extend that, go further down the bypass." 

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With files from Angela Walker

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