PEI

Charlottetown property becoming 28-bed transitional housing to help support shelters

There is a new 28-bed transitional housing complex being set up in Charlottetown for Islanders experiencing homelessness.

Shelter for men, women and families experiencing homelessness

Smith Lodge will be renovated and ready to open by summer of 2020. (Kerry Campbell/CBC)

A new 28-bed transitional housing complex is being set up in Charlottetown for Islanders experiencing homelessness.

In a news release, officials said the province has entered into a purchase and sale agreement for the collection of properties in the city known as Smith Lodge.

The P.E.I. Housing Corporation has purchased the land located at Weymouth and Dorchester streets for $1.3 million.

The location was closed earlier this month. Now it will be renovated and ready to open by summer 2020 as transitional housing.

"Adding more transitional beds in Charlottetown will help shelters such as Bedford MacDonald House and Blooming House that are seeing increased demand," said Minister of Social Development and Housing Ernie Hudson, in the release.

'Safe and suitable housing helps to strengthen the economy, build communities and support overall personal well-being,' said Minister of Social Development and Housing Ernie Hudson. (Kerry Campbell/CBC)

Hudson said Smith Lodge will provide safe and supportive housing to Islanders at a vulnerable time.

"We … want to have the services, the facilities to move these individuals or provide for these individuals, transition back out into the Island marketplace in general," he said.

He said the Smith Lodge location is a step in the process of getting Islanders back on their feet — some clients will come from shelters like Bedford MacDonald House and Blooming House.

Hudson said people will be able to stay in the transitional housing for a year.

"While they can transition back out into apartment units across the province," Hudson said.

In an email, a spokesperson for the province said that while the P.E.I. Housing Corporation will own the property, the province's "vision is to see it operated by a community organization."

Housing is critical for raising healthy families and creating success in education, Hudson said in the release.

"Safe and suitable housing helps to strengthen the economy, build communities and support overall personal well-being," Hudson said.

More P.E.I. news

With files from Kerry Campbell

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