PEI

Charlottetown green lights 11-unit building, long-term rentals only

Charlottetown city council has approved the rezoning of an apartment building at 71 and 73 Upper Prince St. The decision allows developers to more than double the number of units, from 5 to 11, but limits those units to long-term rentals only.

Upper Prince Street building rezoned against planning committee recommendation

The home on 71 and 73 Upper Prince St. was renovated into multiple apartment units in 1989. (Stephanie vanKampen/CBC)

Charlottetown city council has approved the rezoning of an apartment building at 71 and 73 Upper Prince St. The decision allows developers to more than double the number of units, from 5 to 11, but limits those units to long-term rentals only.  

The aging pink apartment building stands directly across from a school and next to a daycare. 

According to a city report, some residents living in the area expressed opposition to the expansion at a July 23 public meeting, citing traffic and parking concerns. 

Cathy MacDougall, who lives in the area and attended the public meeting, told CBC she's "very disappointed" in council's decision.

MacDougall said the street has already become too busy and a larger building will only add to the problem. She said council doesn't seem to be listening to residents. 

"Why do they send these letters out to us asking for our opinion when they don't listen to us," said MacDougall.

The city's own planning committee had recommended against the proposal, but a city staff report recommended council approve the application.

'Welcome addition in the housing crisis'

A resolution to reject the rezoning was defeated six to three by council. Instead, councillors passed the rezoning, with the caveat that a development agreement must include only long-term rentals and that the plans must undergo a design review.

The owner said at a public meeting last month the building will maintain the empire architecture. (Stephanie vanKampen/CBC)

Councillors said the low vacancy rate in Charlottetown factored into their vote.

"I felt that six units in that area is certainly a welcome addition in the housing crisis that we're in," said Coun. Greg Rivard.

Councillor for the area, Mitchell Tweel, said he was shocked by the decision. 

"If we don't want the citizens to be a part of the decision-making process, then let's be upfront and state that from the outset," he said.

The home, which houses both addresses, had been renovated into multiple apartment units in 1989. The proposal, according to a city report said the owner of the property, will maintain a "mansard roof style" and encompass 18,780 square feet.

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