PEI

Controversial road proposal shut down by Charlottetown council

Charlottetown has decided not to proceed with a controversial road proposal that would have connected a local business to a residential street.

Road would have created new access to Mel's Convenience Store

Coun. Greg Rivard moved to defer the decision, but he rescinded it and the proposal to build a road connecting Mel's Convenience Store to Angus Drive was voted down. (Tony Davis/CBC)

Charlottetown has decided not to proceed with a controversial road proposal that would have connected a local business to a residential street.

The proposal would have required a new road to be built to for vehicles to go directly from Mel's Convenience Store — which is located on St. Peters Road — to Angus Drive.

Eight councillors voted against the motion, including Greg Rivard.

"There's a safety component that has to be paramount… as the residents are concerned with the additional traffic," he said.

Rivard moved to defer the decision, but he rescinded it and the proposal was voted down, but an option was left to hear another proposal if new information is presented.

The proposal was to provide another route to Mel's Convenience Store because the province plans to build a roundabout along St. Peters Road this summer. (CBC News Graphics)

Mike Duffy, chair of planning and heritage for the city, was the only one to vote in favour of the road being built. He said residents have been vocal about not wanting the road due to traffic concerns, but he doesn't believe traffic would have  been an issue.

"The other problem people were having was with truck traffic. Simply if you don't want truck traffic, simply put up [a sign saying] no truck traffic. That solves that problem," he said. "It shouldn't be used as a reason to kill an idea or kill a project."

Duffy said without the road between Mel's Convenience Store and Angus Drive, people will have to instead take a longer route on a roundabout that will be constructed soon.

Angus Drive resident Paul McGonnell was pleased with council's decision.

"It would be too much traffic for this residential street," he said. I'm glad council saw it our way."

Residents also voiced concerns about the way the city advertised a public meeting for the development.

Mike Duffy, the chair of planning and heritage with the city of Charlottetown, was the only councillor to vote for the proposal. (Tony Davis/CBC)

Duffy said around six people gave their opinions at a public meeting and about eight letters were sent. He said he doesn't think that should be enough to kill a project.

Duffy said the developer can offer another solution that can be brought back to council. He's hoping to see a solution offered that is acceptable to all parties at the regular council meeting next month.

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