PEI

Solutions to P.E.I.'s housing crunch: Your comments

On Tuesday, as part of the government's Housing Action Plan, the province announced it was looking for long-term housing proposals and ideas to create new affordable housing.

'Yes! Someone should build subdivisions with tiny houses'

Mitchell JD said with no rentals available in the capital, and 'many vacant homes' in rural P.E.I., that there is perhaps a remedy in further investments in public transportation. (John Robertson/CBC)

On Tuesday, as part of the government's Housing Action Plan, the province announced it was looking for long-term housing proposals and ideas to create new affordable housing.

Many Islanders weighed in on CBC Prince Edward Island's Facebook page in response to Tuesday's story.

Here's what you had to say.

(Please note that usernames are not necessarily the names of commenters. Some comments have been altered to correct spelling and to conform to CBC style.)

Could tiny homes be a big solution?

Rose Savoy-Clarke said the province should buy land and build tiny homes. 

"Base rent on person's income, and allow them to turn the rent toward the house cost, so in turn it becomes theirs over time," she said.

Cathy Lettues agreed with Savoy-Clarke. "Yes! Someone should build subdivisions with tiny houses."

Heather Scott says the province should build 'a block or two of tiny homes.' (Mark Crosby/CBC)

Other commenters thought along the same line, encouraging the province to invest in communities of tiny homes.

Grant Kennedy said his tiny home was built in eight days by two people, and that they cost less, use less resources and have less environmental impact.

Heather Scott said the province should build "a block or two of tiny homes."

"There are cities [that] have turned regular housing lots into four to six tiny homes," she said."Each with their own little yard. Most are solar powered and small enough that heating is electric."

Invest in rural areas, outside of Charlottetown

Rob MacIsaac said the province should buy up the older mini homes in the Heritage Park in Summerside and relocate them and rent them out.

"It will provide financial help for the current owners, help out small families who need help now and would be a positive move that could pay rewards come election time," he said.

Mitchell JD said with no rentals available in the city, and "many vacant homes" in rural P.E.I., that there could be a remedy in further investments in public transportation.

'Population is growing and it will keep growing, so expand outside Charlottetown,' says Giselle M. Gonzalez. (Brian McInnis/The Canadian Press)

"Provide public transport outside of city limits!" he said. "The housing crunch is in Charlottetown. Rural places have houses abandoned and would welcome an increase in numbers."

Giselle M. Gonzalez said the government should focus on building homes in Stratford and Cornwall and to give businesses further incentives to set up shop in those municipalities. 

"Make both have stores too so people will be able to shop there and not depend on Charlottetown for everything…. Population is growing and it will keep growing, so expand outside Charlottetown."

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About the Author

Cody MacKay

Web Writer

Cody hails from Summerside, Prince Edward Island, and is a UPEI History and Carleton Masters of Journalism alum. He joined CBC P.E.I. in July, 2017. Reach him at cody.mackay@cbc.ca

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