PEI

'We can have peace': Town of Tignish reflects on tragedy after both bodies found

As family and friends prepare for the funerals of Glen DesRoches and Moe Getson, both who were missing after their boat capsized last Tuesday, the community of Tignish is reflecting on a week of tragedy, and how they plan to move forward.

'When a tragedy like this occurs, the people gather together'

The bodies of Glen DesRoches, left, and Moe Getson, right, have both been recovered. They were missing after their boat the Kyla Anne capsized last Tuesday. (Submitted by DesRoches family and Isabelle Getson)

As family and friends prepare for the funerals of Glen DesRoches and Moe Getson, both who were missing after their boat capsized last Tuesday, the community of Tignish is reflecting on a week of tragedy, and how they plan to move forward.

Mayor of Tignish, Allan McInnis, said it's been a difficult week for the town, but that finally finding both men's bodies is a relief for everyone.

"Now we'll do our mourning properly and then we can put everything to rest where we don't have to constantly be thinking of our lost comrades," McInnis said. 

Pulling together 

DesRoches and Getson's boat capsized last week off North Cape. One crew member was able to swim to shore, but the other men went missing, which prompted both official and community searches.

Some volunteered by bringing food to search crews, while others provided them donations like dry socks.

Community members searched along the shoreline of North Cape for days hoping to locate the missing bodies of the two fishermen. (Nicole Williams/CBC)

McInnis said he's not surprised by the way the town pulled together. 

"I've been involved in the fishing industry all my life for approximately 50 years. I've seen this before. Unfortunately we'll see it again," he said.

"When a tragedy like this occurs, the people gather together ... they pull together and they work to help the families and they spend as many hours as they can to volunteer to their time."

Looking for answers

Father John Molino, who preaches at St. Simon and St. Jude Church in the town, said it will take time for the community to heal. He said both men were members of the community and that many people were in denial after the boat capsized.

"Words cannot describe the feelings that we have as a community and personally and individually," Molina said.

Father John Molina at a vigil held for Glen DesRoches Sunday. (Nicole Williams/CBC )

"People felt angry with everything, blaming the equipment, the person."

Molina said there are still questions about what happened with the boat, but agreed that finding both men's bodies has brought relief to people. 

"It has been a really interesting process for everybody to try and find meaning on what happened ... now we can have peace."

'We feel for each other'

He added the last week has shown how connected members of the community are with each other, and the rest of the Island.

"We feel for each other and we carry not only our personal burdens but the burdens of everybody in the community. I think that shows how much P.E.I. people are connected," Molina said.

"We are a community and we are grateful for that."

Visitation hours for DesRoches will be at the Rooney Funeral Home Wednesday, 6-9 p.m. There will be additional visiting hours on Thursday from 1 p.m. until time of departure.

The funeral for DesRoches will take place Thursday afternoon at St. Simon and St. Jude Church in Tignish at 4 p.m.

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