PEI

Mayoral candidates agree on cosmetic pesticides

The candidates running for mayor of Charlottetown agree cosmetic pesticides have got to go, but not on who is the best candidate to ensure they are banned.

Philip Brown, Keith Kennedy, Clifford Lee all say cosmetic pesticides should be banned

All three candidates for Charlottetown mayor agree it is time to ban cosmetic pesticides.

The candidates running for mayor of Charlottetown agree cosmetic pesticides have got to go, but not on who is the best candidate to ensure they are banned.

"Lawns are being sprayed right up and to the boundaries of our playgrounds. Kids are playing in those areas," said Keith Kennedy, who has put the environment at the centre of his campaign.

"We're going to need a mayor that can stand up to Robert Ghiz. We're going to need a mayor that can say, we don't want pesticides in our city."

Currently the province regulates the use of cosmetic pesticides, but Charlottetown, Stratford and Cornwall have all asked the government to change legislation to allow regulations by communities.

Incumbent Clifford Lee said this should have been done years ago.

"As with most laws you need to have community support, and there's no doubt in my mind that the vast majority of citizens want a ban on cosmetic pesticides," said Lee.

Philip Brown worries that the whole issue will be forgotten if he is not elected.

"It will not be business as usual for Philip Brown," he said.

"Philip Brown as mayor will ensure that we will get something in place by next year."

The province says it is reviewing the pesticide act, including the requests to give communities the power to ban cosmetic pesticides, but adds there is no guarantee any new legislation will be introduced in the fall legislative session.

For mobile device users: Should the P.E.I. government give communities the power to ban cosmetic pesticides?

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