Green Party's Elizabeth May hopeful for federal win in P.E.I.

During a rally in Charlottetown's Legacy Garden Tuesday, Green Party of Canada Leader Elizabeth May said it was possible for Green Party candidates to get elected in Prince Edward Island.
Green Party Leader Elizabeth May criticizes Stephen Harper and calls more local food in Charlottetown. 1:17

During a rally in Charlottetown's Legacy Garden Tuesday, Green Party of Canada Leader Elizabeth May said it was possible for Green Party candidates to get elected in Prince Edward Island.

"Let your friends and neighbours know, Greens are electable on Prince Edward Island," said May.

May was the first federal leader to make a visit to P.E.I. during the federal election campaign.

May told supporters that after Peter Beven-Baker's landslide win in the provincial election in May, the three candidates running for the federal seats could have a chance.

"It shows we can elect Greens on P.E.I. That's the key and the important thing is once you have that breakthrough, it becomes easier for more Greens to follow."

But Bevan-Baker was a bit more cautious and said federal Green candidates don't have the same advantages and attention he had as the provincial leader of the Green Party.

But he adds it doesn't mean they won't be successful.

"They'll run the best campaigns they can, but they're just not going to have the exposure I did. That doesn't mean they can't succeed though."

Teresa Doyle says she's not making any predictions, especially after the provincial election result that few had predicted. She is running for the Green Party in the riding of Cardigan.

"I certainly didn't enter this race with any high expectations, but it is a free country, and there is an incredible climate for change right now," said Doyle.

While May is the first federal party leader to visit P.E.I., there is no indication yet if the leaders of the Conservatives, Liberals, or NDP parties will be visiting before the election on Oct. 19.  

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