PEI·Video

Charlottetown residents asked to remember old elm trees

With more than 300 diseased elm trees being cut down across Charlottetown this week, city officials are suggesting ways for residents to honour those trees with photos, memories, and stories.

Diseased elm trees in Charlottetown now being cut down as city launches campaign to honour them

Work to cut and remove diseased elm trees has begun

8 years ago
Duration 1:10
The city of Charlottetown is removing diseased elm trees from public and private land.

With more than 300 diseased elm trees being cut down across Charlottetown this week, city officials are suggesting ways for residents to honour those trees with photos, memories, and stories. 

They note that while they know it's the right decision to remove the diseased trees in order to properly manage Dutch elm disease, it still doesn't make it any easier to see them cut down.

City councillor Kevin Ramsay said some of these trees have been an important part of the city's landscape for decades.

He said the city is encouraging members of the public to post a picture or story on social media about their favourite tree in Charlottetown.

"Some of these trees are over a hundred years old," said Ramsay. "They have been in our squares for years and all along our streets. So once they are gone, people might be driving along saying 'This is awful bare looking,' and I always liked the elm trees there. So we are just sort of reminiscing I guess is the word to use. So they won't forget them."

The city will be starting a re-planting program this year, which will see two trees planted on public land for every publicly-owned tree removed due to Dutch elm disease. 

Ramsay notes the city is looking at ways to make use of the wood from the cut trees in a controlled manner that won't spread the disease further. 

He hopes to have an announcement on that soon, but said in the meantime, he hopes the community will honour these majestic trees.

Residents are being asked use the hashtag #hugatree on Facebook or Twitter.

The city will select the best photo or story posted to win a tree.

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