PEI

What's that on the waterfront? Take a tour of the Canada C3

About 400 Canadians are taking a trip from coast to coast to coast on the ​Canada C3 for Canada's 150th anniversary of confederation in 2017. The voyage is 150 days from Toronto to Victoria via the Northwest Passage. The idea is to bring Canadians together to share their ideas and experiences.
Erin Gillespie is one of 10 Islanders that is taking the voyage on the Canada C3. There are 15 legs and she is spending one of them, about 10 days, on the ship. (Krystalle Ramlakhan/CBC)

About 400 Canadians are taking a trip from coast to coast to coast on the ​Canada C3 for Canada's 150th anniversary of confederation in 2017.

The voyage is 150 days from Toronto to Victoria via the Northwest Passage. The idea is to bring Canadians together to share their ideas and experiences. 

This ship is travelling 23,000 km across the country and stopped in Charlottetown Thursday. The project cost $10 million, with about 65 per cent funding by the Canada 150 fund and the remainder coming from other partners.

Erin Gillespie from Sea View, P.E.I., is one of 10 Islanders who are taking part and gave CBC a tour. She is spending about 10 days aboard. There are 15 legs of the trip where people join and leave. 

Erin Gillespie with Mike Wong, chief scientist on board the C3, in the science lab where they've been testing water collected across Canada. She's been helping scientists look for seabirds and whales as well. (Krystalle Ramlakhan/CBC)
Where the passengers eat on the C3 vessel. (Krystalle Ramlakhan/CBC)
Erin Gillespie shows the Legacy Room on the C3 ship. Gifts from the voyage from Indigenous communities the passengers are meeting along the way are in here. (Krystalle Ramlakhan/CBC)
This is the carved figure from the 1966 movie Paddle to the Sea film. It's been put in the water along the voyage quite a few times. (Krystalle Ramlakhan/CBC)
Passengers have been doing smudging in the Legacy Room. (Krystalle Ramlakhan/CBC)
One of the rooms that the passengers stay in. (Krystalle Ramlakhan/CBC)
The hangar is the area where people can talk and decompress after spending time exploring communities during the day or sharing stories with other people on board. (Krystalle Ramlakhan/CBC)
On the roof of the hanger there are some canoes. (Krystalle Ramlakhan/CBC)
People in the hanger on the back of the ship where people can hang out, chat with others, and the daily briefings of the schedules are held. (Krystalle Ramlakhan/CBC)
People can tour the C3 Friday and Saturday. (Krystalle Ramlakhan/CBC)

About the Author

Krystalle Ramlakhan is a multi-platform journalist with CBC Ottawa. She has also worked for CBC in P.E.I., Winnipeg and Iqaluit.