PEI

Airport considers donating seized goods to food bank

Charlottetown Airport is considering donating to the local food bank gels, liquids, and other consumables seized from passengers boarding planes.

Charlottetown Airport may provide the local food bank with gels, liquids, and other consumables seized from passengers boarding planes.

'As long as we're meeting health standards, [and] you can tell that the food or whatever's left behind is not tampered with.'— Doug Newson, Charlottetown Airport

Currently, the airport throws away those banned materials, as most airports do.

But that's not the case in Ottawa, where airport officials sort out the products and donate them to the city's food bank. It amounts to about 400 items a week.

The program "makes sense — people in need receiving supplies they'd never receive that are otherwise being thrown out. It's not complicated at all," Peter Tilley, director of the Ottawa food bank, told CBC News this week.

"They're going through the stuff anyways, getting rid of the sharp items, leave it to us as food banks to go through the other items."

Charlottetown Food Bank manager Mike MacDonald believes a similar program would be great for P.E.I.

"Anything that we can get our hands on that we're able to pass over to clientele, certainly has a benefit to our clients," said MacDonald.

When approached about the idea, Doug Newson, CEO of the Charlottetown Airport, said not much is confiscated there, but the idea is worth considering.

"That'll be something that'll be looked at in the next few months, as long as we're meeting health standards, [and] you can tell that the food or whatever's left behind is not tampered with," Newson said.

He said he wants to talk to airport security officials before deciding on whether to introduce a food bank program.

The Canadian Air Transport Security Authority has imposed restrictions on passengers bringing gels and liquids, including beverages, shampoo, suntan lotion, toothpaste, creams and hair gel, in carry-on luggage. 

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