Canada·Video

Police dig to check for bodies in Ontario barn could take days

A woman who says her father killed three aboriginal teenage boys and buried at least two of them in a barn northeast of Toronto in the 1950s tells CBC News she is "relieved" but also anxious and emotional as police forensic experts excavate a corner of the barn.

Glenna Mae Breckenridge says her father buried bodies in the barn in the 1950s

Search for answers

6 years ago
2:11
Police are digging at a barn where an Ontario woman believes bodies are buried 2:11

A woman who says her father killed three aboriginal teenage boys and buried at least two of them in a barn northeast of Toronto in the 1950s tells CBC News she is "relieved" but also anxious and emotional as police forensic experts excavate a corner of the barn. 

Watch a report from Ron Charles on the excavation effort, and what it means to Glenna Mae Breckenridge. Breckenridge took CBC News to the farm this summer to tell her story and examine the site with an expert in ground-penetrating radar.

The radar showed signs of something beneath the floor, but without digging, it was impossible to determine what lay beneath the concrete floor. 

The process of digging through the barn floor in a search for possible bodies is expected to take several days.

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