Ottawa·Photos

New exhibition opens at War Museum to remember Vimy

To mark the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge, a new temporary exhibition opens on Thursday at the Canadian War Museum that examines the ways individuals, communities and a nation remember their fallen soldiers.

Exhibition shows how individuals, families and a nation remember the battle

Canadian monumental sculptor Walter Allward (1876 – 1955) was commissioned to create the Vimy Monument in France to commemorate the sacrifice of Canadians killed in the First World War. (Sandra Abma/CBC)

To mark the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge, a new temporary exhibition opens on Thursday at the Canadian War Museum that examines the ways individuals, communities and a nation remember their fallen soldiers.

How Canadians remembered those who fought and died is the theme of Vimy — Beyond the Battle, an exploration of the public and private commemorations of those lost to war.

The temporary exhibition runs until Nov. 12, 2017. Here are a few highlights from the exhibition.

Memories of an Indigenous soldier

The pictographs on this calfskin robe are memories of Corporal Mike Mountain Horse's First World War exploits.

Mountain Horse was a soldier from the Kainai First Nation in Alberta.

A light for every life

Each light on the wall represents one of the 3,598 Canadian soldiers killed at the Battle of Vimy Ridge.

The story behind the medals

Sergeant Masumi Mitsui fought in the Battle of Vimy Ridge. These medals commemorated his First World War service.

After the war, he fought to gain the vote for Japanese-Canadians. 

In 1942, when his family was forced to relocate to an internment camp during the Second World War he threw these medals down in front of an internment official.

Maquette of Vimy Ridge

The museum has created a replica of the Canadian National Vimy Memorial designed by Canadian sculptor and architect Walter Allward.

The actual monument is located in northern France and will be the focal point of commemorations of 100th anniversary of the battle on Sunday.

Highway of Heroes

This banner was unfurled from a bridge above the Highway of Heroes in Ontario. A stretch of Highway 401 near Trenton has become a funeral route for Canadian soldiers killed in Afghanistan.

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