Ottawa

Speed cameras earn $2.5M for Ottawa

Speed cameras installed at eight intersections in Ottawa captured more than $2.5 million in fines between July and December last year, the city says.

Revenue to be spent on road safety including improvements to intersections, mayor says

Speed cameras in Ottawa led to more than 47,000 charges and raked in more than $2.5 million in revenue for the city over a six-month period from July to December 2020. (Francis Ferland/CBC)

Speed cameras installed at eight intersections in Ottawa captured more than $2.5 million in fines between July and December last year, the city says.

Four cameras were used, two at fixed locations: one near 50 Bayshore Dr., the other at Innes Road between Provence Avenue and Trim Road. Two more cameras were moved around to six different locations across the city.

Over a six-month period, the traffic cameras led to 47,231 charges totalling $2,559,921 in fines, according to a breakdown provided by the city on Friday.

In December, the city added two more cameras, and plans to install an additional two in the coming weeks, said Mayor Jim Watson.

By the end of February, all eight cameras will be at fixed locations, said Phil Landry, the city's director of traffic services.

In his state of the city address on Wednesday, Watson said all the revenue earned from the traffic cameras will be spent on road safety improvements.

The mere presence of the cameras appears to be helping, Watson said, with staff reporting more drivers abiding by speed limits since they were installed.

"The kind of behavioural changes we want to see from drivers as part of this program," said Watson in his address.

with files from CBC's Giacomo Panico

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