Ottawa

Ottawa River dropping — with 1 exception

Water levels along the southern section of the Ottawa River have peaked and are now dropping — with one exception.

Water levels at Pembroke could rise another 40 cm, peaking Monday

Jean-Marc Daze stands ankle-deep in water in Clarence-Rockland, Ont., on Thursday, May 2, 2019. The Ottawa River peaked and is dropping there and in most areas of the river's southern basin, but is expected to continue rising at Pembroke, Ont. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

Water levels along the southern section of the Ottawa River have peaked and are now dropping — with one exception.

The Ottawa River Regulation Planning Board, which manages and monitors water levels, said at 5 p.m. Friday the water level in Pembroke was at 113.22 metres above sea level, up five centimetres from Thursday afternoon. The forecast for Pembroke is improving however: it had been expected to rise to 113.60 metres above sea level, but now the board expects it to stop at 113.45, which is still much higher than the 2017 flood levels. 

Lac Coulonge was at 108.78 metres, down six centimetres from Thursday afternoon. The river reached its peak there on Tuesday at 109.05 metres and is receding, although it could bounce back to Tuesday's peak levels again by the middle of next week.

Arnprior was at 76.07 metres, down seven centimetres from Thursday afternoon. The river reached its peak there on Tuesday at 76.31 metres.

Britannia in west Ottawa was at 60.56 metres, down seven centimetres from Thursday afternoon. It reached its peak of 60.70 metres on Thursday.

The Hull Marina in Gatineau was at 45 metres, down 11 centimetres from Thursday afternoon. It reached a peak of 45.18 metres.

Thurso, Que., was at 43.55 metres, down seven centimetres from Thursday afternoon. It reached a peak on Thursday of 43.67 metres.

And Hawkesbury, Ont., was at 42.66 metres, down six centimetres from Thursday afternoon. It reached its peak Thursday at 42.76 metres.

Last weekend, the river surpassed 2017 flood water levels in Pembroke, Ont., Lac Coulonge, Arnprior, Ont., and west Ottawa's Britannia neighbourhood, setting records in each location except Pembroke.

Can't see the infographics above? Click here for this year's forecasted river level peaks, and click here to see how much higher water levels are expected to be this year than in 2017.

The next update is expected at 5 p.m. Saturday. The board said it will issue just one daily update now that most areas have peaked.

All forecasts are approximate and subject to change based on the weather and other factors.

All records are based on data from the planning board, which goes back as far as the 1930s in some areas.

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