Ottawa

56K gathered on Parliament Hill for Canada's 152nd birthday

When events wrapped up at the Canada Day celebration on Parliament Hill more than 56,000 people had attended over the course of the day, according to the Parliamentary Protective Service.

Security screening wait times remained low throughout day

People cheer during the the Canada Day noon show on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Monday, July 1, 2019. (Justin Tang/Canadian Press)

When events wrapped up at the Canada Day celebration on Parliament Hill more than 56,000 people had attended over the course of the day, according to the Parliamentary Protective Service.

There was a capacity crowd for the evening celebrations with approximately 30,000 people taking in the show and fireworks.

Wait time remained minimal throughout the celebration, according to officials, with little to no delay getting through security screenings.

Attendance on the Hill for Canada Day varies, mainly depending on the weather.

In 2018, when the temperature climbed to a scorching 34.7 C but felt more like 47 with the humidity, the maximum number of people on the Hill was 6,000, and dropped throughout the day.

In 2017, for sesquicentennial celebrations, it was cloudy and rainy and there were security checkpoint delays, but about 25,000 people were on the Hill for the noon show.

The Hill's maximum capacity is about 30,000.

Paramedics said Monday evening that eight people were taken to hospital for heat-related issues. 

Your Canada Day weather forecast (hot, with a low chance of rain)

Hill event schedule

The noon show, which ran until 1:45 p.m., included K'naan, T. Thomason, Karim Ouellet and Shawnee, accompanied by the National Arts Centre Orchestra, as well as a performance by Les Ballets Jazz de Montréal.

The evening show, which ran from 6:45 p.m. to 10 p.m., included Kaytranada, The Strumbellas, Marie Mai, Brett Kissel, Coeur de Pirate, Karim Ouellet, William Prince, Crystal Shawanda and K'naan.

And the fireworks started at 10 p.m. and last until 10:15 p.m.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.