Ottawa

20 new red light cameras coming to Ottawa by end of 2017

The City of Ottawa is setting up 20 new red light cameras at high-collision intersections between now and the end of 2017, hoping to make roads safer and let police focus on other issues.

5 cameras coming to problem intersections by end of 2016, 15 more in 2017

Ottawa's red light camera system uses two parts on the roadside: the larger camera (middle) and the smaller flash (left). (Andrew Foote/CBC)

The City of Ottawa is setting up 20 new red light cameras at high-collision intersections between now and the end of 2017, hoping to make roads safer and let police focus on other issues.

Monday's announcement was made near the intersection of Old Tenth Line Road and St. Joseph Boulevard in Orléans, where a new red light camera will be up and running in the next few days, said Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson.

Four more cameras that snap pictures of vehicles that run red lights so they can be fined are going up by the end of this year at the following intersections:

  • Gladstone Avenue and Rochester Street near Little Italy.
  • Kent Street and Catherine Street near the central bus station.
  • Bank Street and Riverside Drive near Billings Bridge.
  • Kirkwood and Coldrey avenues in Carlington.

Fifteen more cameras will be installed in 2017 at a cost of $35,000 a year each.

The $260 fines collected from the cameras will go toward community safety initiatives, Watson said, adding statistics show there are fewer collisions and injuries at intersections that have red light cameras.

"Collisions resulting from red light running tend to  be more severe than other intersection collisions because they usually involve at least one vehicle travelling very quickly," he said.

"These cameras are one tool we have to make our roads safer," said Coun. Keith Egli, chair of the city's transportation committee.

Watson said cameras also let police focus on other issues instead of assigning officers to watch intersections.

Ottawa currently has 34 of these cameras, set up at intersections with high collision rates since 2000.

The city currently does not have the ability to fine drivers with Quebec licence plates caught on a red light camera, although Phil Landry, manager of traffic services, says they're working on that with the goal of being able to in early 2017.

This is a screengrab of the City of Ottawa's current red light camera network, with 20 more to be installed over the next 15 months. (City of Ottawa)

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