Ottawa

Ottawa police say they're ready to shut down Canada Day occupation attempts

Ottawa city officials laid out their plans for a "unique" Canada Day Monday morning, including shows at LeBreton Flats and efforts to keep anti-government protests from turning into another occupation.

Vehicle exclusion zone in and around downtown starts Wednesday morning

Ottawa prepares for protests to coincide with Canada Day

1 month ago
Duration 1:59
Ottawa’s mayor and police say they are prepared for any planned protests around Canada Day celebrations, but business owners and residents say they are bracing themselves after February’s disruption.

Ottawa city officials say they are prepared for a "unique" Canada Day, with plans to keep anti-government protests from turning into another occupation.

The traditional nationally broadcast shows are returning for the first time since 2019, this time from the plaza in front of the Canadian War Museum because of ongoing construction on Parliament Hill.

Ottawa police say they expect more protests and larger crowds than usual during Canada Day celebrations as groups related to the Freedom Convoy continue to plan demonstrations. Some in those groups have indicated they'd like to protest through July and August.

"This is expected to be a unique Canada Day, with larger crowds and a larger event footprint," interim Ottawa police Chief Steve Bell said during a Monday news conference.

WATCH | Interim police Chief Steve Bell talks about plans for Canada Day 

Police promise ‘swift and decisive’ action against any Canada Day occupation attempts

1 month ago
Duration 0:37
Steve Bell, interim Ottawa police chief, says protesters will not be allowed to set up structures like sheds or tents, or have their own dance parties on city streets.

"We've developed our plans in the shadow of the unlawful protests and Rolling Thunder event. We've been speaking with community members and businesses and we're very aware of the lingering trauma and concern about what they're hearing after those events."

Bell said officers will allow legal protests while shutting down illegal activities, including setting up structures or speakers without a permit and the threat of occupation, like on downtown streets in the winter.

He said police have been following online commentary and trying to talk to people who've said they're coming to protest.

Two police officers escort someone away.
Police take a person into custody as they worked to clear an area on Rideau Street during a convoy-style protest participants called Rolling Thunder in Ottawa April 29, 2022. (Justin Tang/The Canadian Press)

"[We've] planned, we're prepared and we have the resources," Bell replied when answering a question about whether police were ready to step in again like they did in late April, when attempts to gather near the Rideau Centre mall were shut down by officers.

Provincial police and the RCMP have offered help to shut down occupation attempts as long as there's a risk, he said.

The Ottawa Police Services Board received an update on plans for Canada Day when it met Monday evening.

Bell spoke about the toll recent months have taken on officers, noting the demand is not "sustainable" and describing police as "fatigued" ahead of the long weekend.

"For this event we've actually had to cancel days off, we've cancelled discretionary time off, called people back from annual leave," said the chief. "This is an all hands on deck event, but that has a cost on the health and wellbeing of our members."

At least 5 days of traffic control

Last week, Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson told people thinking of coming to the capital "not to be intimidated by individuals who may be coming to Ottawa to cause trouble."

He said Monday he wants this to be a safe, festive event for children and families and that people who "come to disrupt" will be dealt with, without a warning.

Bell told the police board that the force has been clear with its expectations for demonstrators, and that harassment won't be tolerated.

"If there is a hate or bias crime incidents, if there's intimidation or threats, we will actively investigate those," he said, adding police know residents have "scars" from the occupation.

"I want to reassure you that those feelings, that trauma that our community has felt is front and centre in all of our planning efforts and will be front and centre in our response efforts."

Overall, Bell said police are expecting hundreds of thousands of people downtown. For comparison, an estimated 56,000 people went to the shows on Parliament Hill in 2019 and that doesn't count everyone celebrating nearby.

About 16,000 people attended the noon show on the Hill in 2019. (CBC News)

There will be the traditional Canada Day road closures Friday July 1 and early Saturday, though there are more closures near LeBreton Flats because of that change in show location.

But Ottawa police are establishing another "vehicle exclusion zone" — similar to what was set up in late April for the Rolling Thunder motorcycle rally — with no street parking at all and no protest vehicles allowed in from 8 a.m. this Wednesday until at least 6 a.m. on Monday, July 4.

A map of police checkpoints in Ottawa.
Ottawa police are controlling access to these parts of downtown, including two river bridges. All vehicles that aren't involved in rallies or protests will be allowed in, the city says, but drivers cannot park on the street. (City of Ottawa)

Those plans may change if needed, officials said Monday. People are asked to plan ahead, expect delays and check city pages and local media for updates.

OC Transpo and Société de transport de l'Outaouais service is free July 1 and when it comes to OC Transpo, until 4 a.m. July 2.

With files from Dan Taekema

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