Ottawa

Ottawa makes late night talk shows as protest enters 2nd week

From news coverage in the U.K., to as far away as New Zealand, the protest, the city and police's handling of the truck convoy has drawn international attention.

Comedians Stephen Colbert, Trevor Noah weighed in on convoy protest this week

The Daily Show pretended to send correspondent Desi Lydic to Ottawa to cover the protests earler this week, but host Trevor Noah could not hear her above the horn noise, so she used horn honks as morse code to report. (The Daily Show/YouTube)

The continuing protest in the nation's capital, which started as a call for an end to all vaccine mandates, is being watched around the world.

From news coverage in the U.K., to as far away as New Zealand, the protest, the city and police's handling of the truck convoy has drawn international attention.

But it takes a lot for the once-sleepy — or as John Oliver put it years ago, "depressing" and "frigid" city — to make the late night talk show rounds: flash back to the time Ottawa got a shout-out for one in five residents being outed as subscribers of the adulterer website Ashley Madison or the time Stephen Colbert praised then-House of Commons Sergeant-at-Arms Kevin Vickers for his dramatic takedown of the Parliament Hill shooter in 2014, saying "to hell with Bruce Willis."

This time around, with this days-long protest, the nation's capital is once again attracting the attention of those talk shows.

Earlier this week, Trevor Noah joked on The Daily Show that "you can really feel these truckers' passion. I mean, you can't hear it because they're honking over everything." 

Meanwhile, Stephen Colbert touched on reports of a confederate flag seen at the protest and that many Americans were taking part in the protests. "On behalf of all Americans, Canada, let me just say, sorry."

As much as the comedians might be having fun taking a jab at Ottawa, many residents aren't as jovial, after they say they've faced sleepless nights and high levels of stress as a cacophony of horns keep them up, harassment from some participants, and significant delays reaching the hospital for medical treatments.

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