Ottawa

Ontario Municipal Board dismisses appeal over Zibi development

The Ontario Municipal Board has dismissed an appeal that could have brought a halt to a major redevelopment on two Ottawa River islands considered sacred to First Nations.

Board finds development conforms to city's official plan, tosses 'well-intended' appeal

An aerial view of what the Zibi development could look like once complete. (Windmill/Dream)

The Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) has dismissed an appeal that could have brought a halt to a major redevelopment on two Ottawa River islands considered sacred to First Nations.

In December 2014, renowned Canadian architect Douglas Cardinal and five other people filed the appeal against the proposed 37-acre Zibi development, which aims to bring condos, shops, waterfront parks and a boutique hotel to the Chaudière and Albert Islands and the Gatineau waterfront.

Specifically, Cardinal and the others were appealing the city's approval of rezoning applications made by Windmill Developments, the site's developer.

The OMB dismissed an appeal filed by a handful of people, including architect Douglas Cardinal, against the Zibi redevelopment project Tuesday. (CBC Ottawa)

In its Tuesday decision, the OMB said the proposed development conformed to the city of Ottawa's official plan and struck down the applicants' "well-intended" appeal.

"The Board finds that the appeals, while well-intended, consist of mere apprehensions raised by the Appellants that are not worthy of the adjudicative process of the Board and do not merit a full hearing," wrote the OMB their decision.

In a statement, Windmill Developments co-founder Jeff Westeinde said he was "greatly encouraged" by the board's finding.

"We know the project is highly anticipated, and we look forward to delivering on our vision," Westeinde said in the statement.

The first condos on the Ottawa side of the Zibi development went on sale earlier this month, despite protests outside the sales facility.

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