Ottawa

Injured O'Connor Street cyclist thanks Good Samaritans, seeks jacket's owner

A man injured while riding on the O'Connor Street bike lane earlier this week is saying thank you to the Good Samaritans who stopped to help him, and looking for the owner of a bright orange jacket.

Man struck on O'Connor Street bike lane just hours after opening ceremony

This orange jacket was left behind by a Good Samaritan at the scene of a collision between a cyclist and a car on O'Connor Street on Oct. 25, 2016. (Coun. David Chernushenko)

The cyclist injured in a collision with a car on O'Connor Street earlier this week is thanking the Good Samaritans who stopped to help, and looking to connect with one in particular — the owner of a bright orange jacket.

The cyclist, described by paramedics as a man in his 30s or 40s, was riding in the newly opened O'Connor Street bike lane around 5:30 p.m. Tuesday when a car turning left onto Waverley Street struck him.

He was taken to hospital in stable condition with injuries to his shoulder and ribs.

The collision occurred just hours after the official opening of the segregated, bi-directional bike lane.

The cyclist was struck by a car turning left on Waverley Street. (Submitted)

Message of thanks

On Friday Coun. David Chernushenko, in whose ward the cyclist lives, posted a message on his website from the cyclist and his wife "to all those who came to the aid" of the injured man.

"We'd like to thank you for your amazing kindness and generosity to a stranger who needed help. We were both very touched by it all and extremely grateful," the message reads.

"I suppose we are not really strangers, as I feel a certain camaraderie with other cyclists, knowing the potential dangers that can exist on even a daily commute.  We all have to look out for each other — pedestrians, cyclists and drivers. This is our community."

According to the message the cyclist, who wishes to remain anonymous, is at home recovering and "still in quite a bit of pain," but improving with each day.

"The good vibes we got from this situation will go towards the healing process, I believe that," the message reads.

It concludes with a plea to the owner of an orange jacket that was used to cover the cyclist and keep him warm until paramedics arrived.

The couple wish to return the jacket to its owner, and that person is asked to contact Chernushenko's office to get it back.

"I have had a good conversation with the injured cyclist's wife. They do not wish to become the centre of ongoing stories and discussions around cycling in the city, so prefer to stay anonymous," Chernushenko said.

"I am first and foremost glad to know that the injuries, though extensive, are not critical."